Neurodiagnostic Licensure, If Not Now, When?

The American Society of Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists (ASET) is working with chapters, regional and state societies to introduce and pass state licensure legislation. Legislation is necessary to protect neurodiagnostic technologist’s scope of practice and protect the patients you serve. ASET has been collecting stories to demonstrate that properly educated and trained neurodiagnostic technologist are the best medical professionals to conduct neurodiagnostic procedures. Passing licensure legislation for Neurodiagnostic professionals is one of the strategic goals set by the ASET Board of Trustees. But why is it so important to pursue licensure for neurodiagnostic technology?

As health care becomes less and less lucrative, many allied health fields are looking for additional sources of revenue. If their own professional scope of practice is not providing the income that is desired, they can, and do, attempt to write some aspects of Neurodiagnostic Technology into their own scope of practice. This action would essentially make it legal for them to perform neurodiagnostic studies and potentially illegal for neurodiagnostic technologists to perform them. Without a license to protect neurodiagnostic scope of practice, others can take ownership of duties traditionally performed by Neurodiagnostic Technologists.  Eventually, the field could be usurped by others and we will be deemed unqualified to do what we have chosen, studied and trained to do. Having a state license specific to neurodiagnostics will, in the long run, be the best way to protect your job and ensure quality testing on your patients.

Another important aspect of licensure is patient safety. It is up to us to make sure that the patients we care for receive the best possible treatment. Until we have licensure we cannot ensure that properly trained neurodiagnostic technologists are caring for the new born baby in NICU, the teenager who just had their first seizure, or the family member having back surgery. It is up to us to band together and work towards licensure to ensure patient safety. The well-being of our patients depends on having properly-trained and credentialed technologists conducting neurodiagnostic procedures.

The best way to pass licensure legislation in your state is to take action. Get involved in the political process and let you voice be heard. Download the Point of Contact handbook and set up a meeting with your elected officials. Share your own story on the ASET website or form a licensure committee in your state.

If you are interested in taking any of these actions please contact Bradley A. Hix, Governmental & Grassroots Advocacy Manager at 816.931.1120, ext. 105 or bradley@aset.org.


Bradley Hix obtained his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He earned his Master of Arts in Political Science from Western Illinois University where he was a Graduate Teaching Assistant and a member of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society. He currently is the Governmental & Grassroots Advocacy Manager for ASET-The Neurodiagnostic Society. 

Bradley obtained his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He earned his Master of Arts in Political Science from Western Illinois University where he was a Graduate Teaching Assistant and a member of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society. He currently is the Governmental & Grassroots Advocacy Manager for ASET-The Neurodiagnostic Society.

5 thoughts on “Neurodiagnostic Licensure, If Not Now, When?

  • Reply Aiman Mahfouz November 10, 2015 at 10:05

    Would the License be for Technicians so the neurophysiologist’s name will vanish.
    Are we supposed to support a liciense that will limit our abilities in the OR while giving more power to the reading physicians.

    • Reply Richard Vogel December 3, 2015 at 18:19

      I think what will come of this is multi-tier licensure. Basically, anyone involved in IONM at any level will be required to have a license. The CNIM will have a license and be required to practice IONM under direct physician supervision. The D.ABNM (or similar) will have a license and be able to 1) supervise CNIMs, and 2) practice IONM under indirect physician supervision. The physician/MD/DO will have a license as he/she does now. I don’t see it as giving more power to the reading physicians. They already have all the power. Rather, I see it as 1) drawing a line in the sand for those people who refuse to get any kind of certification in IONM (either get certified or find another career), and 2) giving more oversight power to those of us in the field who have earned professional board certification.

  • Reply Kristina Port November 10, 2015 at 11:17

    If you are a stakeholder in any area under this scope of practice, I encourage your comments, concerns, and action step solutions that would collaboratively result in a state legislative action. In which state are you residing? Kristina Port

  • Reply Bradley Hix November 10, 2015 at 12:04

    ASET has created a “Model Bill” that may be found at http://www.aset.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3726

    The proposed legislation does not eliminate neurophysiologist’s role in providing care.

    How would a license limit your abilities in the OR?

  • Reply Happy Holidays from Neurologic Labs!NeurologicLabs December 2, 2015 at 11:40

    […] from benchtop electrophysiology in the pharmaceutical industry. Just recently, in 2015, Bradley Hix wrote about the neurodiagnostic licensure efforts that ASET is sponsoring. I have actually had lots […]

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