• The Dark Side of Neuromonitoring

    In the Star Wars movie franchise, the force is an energy field created by all living things that binds the universe together. There are two sides to the force, the light side and the dark side, respectively representing good and evil. The light side of the force is used by individuals who draw ...

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  • 2017 Atlantic Health IONM and EEG Conference

    Overlook Medical Center and Atlantic Neuroscience Institute Presents: Comprehensive Intraoperative Neuromonitoring and Continuous Bedside EEG & Epilepsy Concurrent Courses April 22-23, 2017 Overlook Medical Center Atlantic Neuroscience Institute Auditorium –Fifth Floor Lobby Level 99 Beauvoir Avenue Summit, NJ SAVE $$$: The Early Bird Discount has been extended to March 22nd. Click here to see ...

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  • A New Blog from Veridical RCM

    I want to let you know about a fantastic new blog that just launched and everyone in IONM should check it out. The writer is Melissa Hanley from Veridical RCM (Revenue Cycle Management). Melissa is their CEO, and one of the most authoritative people I’ve ever met on the business of ...

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  • Neuromonitoring for Monsters

    Contrary to what your parents may have told you in an effort to calm your midnight fears in the sweaty aftermath of a childhood nightmare, I regret to inform you that monsters are real and they’re everywhere! In so many hospitals across the country, and perhaps around the world, monsters ...

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  • The Utility of Crossover Motor Evoked Potentials

    Unilateral motor cortex stimulation produces motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) on the opposite side of the body (contralateral) relative to the stimulated cerebral hemisphere. When MEPs are also recorded from the same side of the body (ipsilateral), we sometimes refer to them as “crossover” MEPs. Many people record from both sides of the ...

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  • Understanding Anodal and Cathodal Stimulation

    Whether you practice neurophysiology in surgery, in the lab, or in the clinic, you probably use electrical stimulation to activate the nervous system on a daily basis. As you probably know, cathodal stimulation works best in some applications, while anodal stimulation works best in other applications. Armed with this knowledge, ...

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  • Intraoperative Mapping of Speech & Language Function

    Intraoperative identification of brain regions that subserve speech & language functions is important during surgical procedures that place these regions at risk for iatrogenic injury. Commonly, the surgeon endeavors to extract a tumor, or abnormal brain tissue that causes intractable seizures, while also preserving eloquent cortex. Damage to language centers can result ...

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  • Etymology of Neuroscience Terms

    This table lists the original Greek and Latin meanings of neuroscience words. Most of the words are neuroanatomical terms, but neurological symptoms and disorders are also included. NOTE: if you are viewing this from a mobile device, you may need to use s landscape view. Word Meaning abducens drawing away ...

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  • Top 10 Reasons to Join a Professional Society

    Becoming a member of a professional society is an important step in your career. It shows that your interests transcend the paycheck, that you care about your field, and that you want to be a part of something bigger than your J-O-B. By joining a society you become a member ...

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  • Optimizing Spinal Cord Stimulator Placement with Neuromonitoring

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) involves delivery of therapeutic doses of electrical current to the spinal cord for the management of neuropathic pain. The most common indications include post-laminectomy syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, ischemic limb pain, and angina (Falowski, Celii & Sharan, 2008). There are numerous methods for placing a SCS system, depending on the needs ...

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  • The Economics of IONM Expertise

    In a recent blog entry, I reviewed a paper by Canadian Neurophysiologist Jonathan Norton, PhD. The paper addressed the question: Who would surgeons (in Canada) prefer to interpret their IONM data? The review that I wrote was short and to the point, but it got a ton of traffic. Over the ...

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  • Intraoperative Neuromonitoring Graduate Certificate Program

    If you’re looking to transition into the field of surgical neurophysiology, but having difficulty getting your foot in the door due to lack of experience, then perhaps you should consider formal education in neuromonitoring. The University of Connecticut’s (UConn’s) Intraoperative Neuromonitoring Graduate Certificate prepares students for a healthcare career in ...

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  • Challenging the Status Quo in Neuromonitoring

    On March 20-21, 2015, there was a fantastic conference on neuromonitoring at Overlook Medical Center in Summit, NJ. If you didn’t attend, you really missed out! Not to worry, though…I’m writing today to tell you a little about the conference. We had a truly outstanding group of speakers, including: Drs. Chuck ...

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  • Who is Qualified to Interpret Neuromonitoring Data?

    There is a great deal of controversy in the field of Intraoperative Neurophysiology regarding what makes one qualified to interpret neuromonitoring data. Must the interpreter be a physician? A neurologist? What about an audiologist? Are you qualified with a PhD in neurophysiology? Does professional board certification matter? If so, which one? In the ...

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  • Filling the Void of Neuromonitoring Knowledge Base

    At the ASNM 2015 Winter Symposium there was a block of talks examining the future of IONM and the emergence of Expert Systems. The ensuing panel discussion acknowledged the demand for high-level and mid-level practitioners in light of the increasing lack of expertise in the OR. I just returned from the ASNM ...

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  • How Many IONM Cases Per Year?

    Neuromonitoring industry analysts estimate that the number of surgical procedures that we monitor in the USA each year ranges from 600-800 thousand. I’ve been wondering, is this accurate? Before you jump to an answer, consider some additional stats: According to some of these same industry analysts, the average number of cases ...

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  • Upcoming IONM and cEEG Course in NJ

    Hey Philly, NY, NJ and everyone who always wanted to visit the Garden State…! I usually don’t advertise conferences and courses within blog posts, but I had a hand in organizing this one… so check it out! For more information, please see: http://www.neuroconference.org/ Comprehensive Intraoperative Neuromonitoring & Continuous Bedside EEG & ...

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  • Job Titles in Neuromonitoring

    There are so many different “job titles” that are used to describe clinical personnel in the field of neuromonitoring (IONM), and it can be confusing to decipher their meaning, particularly because people often use them interchangeably. This post will clarify roles and review the history behind job titles on the professional and ...

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  • A Question About ‘Quality’ Neuromonitoring

    As 2014 comes to a close, I’m starting to look ahead to 2015 and plan topics that I’d like to cover on this blog. One such topic, which I think will cause quite a stir, has to do with quality. In my opinion, the field of neuromonitoring has been watered-down, pulverized to the ...

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  • Meeting the Standard of Care

    Last week on the UNPA website, someone posted a link to a Prezi entitled “Do I Meet Standard of Care? A Critical Look at a Charles Yingling Presentation.” [NOTE: this Prezi has been removed from the web by its author.] Basically, the prezi reviews a malpractice lawsuit in which judgement was made ...

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  • Look No Further: Worst Neuromonitoring Paper Ever

    Have you ever wondered what’s the worst academic paper ever published on the subject of neuromonitoring? I ponder this question sometimes as I review the literature because I read so many awful papers. I can’t help but wonder how some of these papers ever get published, and especially in high-profile ...

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  • Transitioning from Academia to a Career in Neuromonitoring

    In this third post from the series Transitioning to a Career in Neuromonitoring, I tell my personal story about leaving the elite world of academic neuroscience and navigating a new career in IONM. Along the way, I’ll tell you about the skills that helped me to succeed, the challenges that I faced, the ...

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  • Navigating the Neuromonitoring Job Search

    This will be the first in a series of posts dedicated to the topic of Transitioning to a Career in Intraoperative Neurophysiology (aka neuromonitoring, IONM, IOM, etc.). I decided to compose this series of posts because I remember looking at the field of IONM for the first time, as an ...

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  • DABNM Orals – The Unpassable Test?

    My experience taking the DABNM oral exam, and tips that will help you pass! When I first started working in the field of intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM), many of my mentors were Diplomates of the American Board of Neurophysiologic Monitoring. As someone new to the field, learning the ropes and taking ...

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  • 14 Ways to Reduce Needle Sticks in the OR

    Despite the many benefits of neuromonitoring, it is a fact that surgery gets more complicated whenever we are involved in the case. Patient prep time increases, anesthetic requirements change, there’s more people and equipment in the room, the risks are altered and additional consents are required. The risks associated with ...

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